The Top 25 Countries With The Most Connected Workforce

Opportunity examined the professional networks of over 25,000 people worldwide to determine which countries have the most connected workforce.

January 2, 2017

Overview

We set out to discover which countries citizens have the largest professional networks.  In other words, whose workforce appears to place the most value on professional networking and relationship marketing.  To do this, we examined / surveyed over 25,000 Opportunity members from 75 of the world's most populated countries.  Our sample sizes ranged anywhere from as many as 4,690 people (United States) to as few as 51 (Jordan).  When examining the results, we removed outliers such as those people claiming to have extremely large networks (e.g. 15,000+ contacts) as well as those who reported extremely small networks (e.g. below 20 contacts).  On average, we sampled 327 people per country.  We were able to detemine the average number of professional connections per person by taking the total number of connections reported and dividing this number by the total number of people examined per country.  

What We Found

Below is a list of the Top 25 Countries whose workforce on average, have the largest professional networks.  One can conclude that the business culture within these countries place a higher degree of value on professional networking (relationship marketing) as a way to drive more business and/or advance careeers.  See Figure 1.


Country Average # of Connections
Ireland 1507
Hong Kong  1456 
Jordan  1369 
India 1288 
Peru  1261 
United Arab Emirates  1227 
United Kingdom  1223 
Israel  1217 
United States  1183 
Spain  1178 
China  1138 
Singapore  1122 
Qatar  1116 
Chile  1109 
Sri Lanka  1095 
Iran  1062 
Egypt  1055 
Turkey  1035 
Australia 1033 
Argentina  1024 
Russia 1021 
Vietnam  1009 
Indonesia  1007 
Bulgaria  984 
Romania  976 

Figure 1. The Top 25 most networked countries.  
This is the average number of professional connections per person in each country.


Summary

Of the 75 countries we examined, the average number of connections per person ranged from as few as 255 (Camaroon) to as many as 1,507 (Ireland).  As you can see from Figure 1. (The Top 25), people average around 1,100 professional connections.  Each region of the world is more or less equally represented (Asia vs. Middle East vs. Europe vs. South America).  Prior to developing this report we assumed the United States would have the most 'networked' workforce, given that the world's largest online business network (LinkedIn) got it's start (and is headquartered) in the United States (California).  So it was somewhat surprising to see the U.S. ranked as low as #9.  Also noteworthy are those countries that did not make the Top 25 list including large, advanced countries such as Brazil, Canada and Germany (who ironically has it's own professional network, Xing). 

Take a moment to compare the size of your own professional network. How do you stack up to people within your own country and around the world?  The New Year might be as good a time as ever to place more emphasis on growing your network.  Remember, it's not what you know... it's who you know.  :) 


Datasource: Opportunity

Opportunity shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described or information contained on these pages. The data, information and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such. Opportunity gives no warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, utility or completeness of this information.

The State of Salary Trends In The United States Heading Into 2017

Opportunity takes a geographical look at the salary discrepancies between job seekers and hiring managers across state lines.

December 30, 2016

Overview
This analysis is a follow up to our recent post titled, "Desired Salary Expectations of U.S. Job Seekers Outpace Companies Willingness to Offer." Here we take a closer look at the discrepancies between what job seekers expect to earn versus the reality of what hiring managers are willing to pay - based on geography.  Our analysis breaks down the salary trends of the four regions across the United States (South, Midwest, Northeast and West) based on five salary range categories (1).  Additionally, we take a closer look at a number of specific states within those regions to determine what influence they had on each region. Our research uses a subset of recent data from the Opportunity business network of over 1.3M professionals worldwide.  The subset includes a list of 20,000 people (job seekers and hiring managers) who created profiles in Q4 2016.

First we'll examine the salary preferences of job seekers in each region followed by the salary preferences of hiring managers.  Then, we'll take a closer look at the discrepancies between the two and what we can conclude from this if anything.

What We Found

Across all four regions, the salary expectations of job seekers within the $75,000 - $150,000 range are quite similar, with approximately 48% - 50% of all workers falling within that salary range.  

Where significant differences begin to occur are at the higher salary ranges.  For example, in the Northeast and the West we see an 8%-9% increase in the number of overall job seekers expecting (or hoping) to receive six figure incomes. Additionally, job seekers in the Northeast and the West are also 35% more likely to command a job making upwards of $200,000.  In fact, the number of job seekers in the Norteast expecting to earn $200,000+ doubles that of job seekers in the South and Midwest.  Job candidates in Connecticut, New York and New Jersey are to blame for the difference as 13% of these workers (on average) expect to earn $200,000+. 

On the lower end of the spectrum, expectations for workers in the South and Midwest are about 7% more likely to seek jobs with salaries below $75,000.  The Midwest leads the way in the percentage of workers expecting to make less than $40,000.

  $25K-$40K $40K-$75K $75K-$100K $100K-$150K $150K-$200K $200K+
Northeast 4.40% 24.86% 23.42%  24.36%  12.81%  10.15%
Midwest 6.12%  28.73% 26.39% 24.28%  9.24%  5.23% 
South 5.77% 29.52%  25.84% 23.84%  10.36%  4.67% 
West 4.64% 24.12%  25.01%  25.61% 12.86%  7.76% 

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Unlike most of the salary expectations of job seekers, the salaries offered by hiring managers vary widely with percentages ranging as much as 14% among the diffrent salary categories.

Look no further than the first column (lowest salary range of $25k - $40k) where only 8% of hiring managers in the Northeast expect a job candidate to accept a position earning below $40,000 versus the Midwest and South where 20% of hiring managers feel they can offer candidates a salary within that lower range.  In fact, nearly 60% of salaries offered in the Midwest and South are below the $75k range versus the Northeast and West where only 40% of salaries offered are below $75k.  Also interesting is how few jobs offered in the Midwest and the South pay at the higher end ($150k+).  The Midwest had ZERO hiring managers offering jobs that pay $150k and only 3% of those in the South offered jobs paying in that range.  The Northeast and the West offered those high paying jobs at 8% and 13% respectively.


  $25K-$40K $40K-$75K $75K-$100K $100K-$150K $150K-$200K $200K+
Northeast 8.16% 30.61% 22.45%  30.61%  2.04%  6.12%
Midwest 20.48%  37.35% 25.30% 16.87%  0.00%  0.00% 
South 19.78% 42.86%  17.58% 16.48%  2.20%  1.10% 
West 16.67% 26.19%  25.00%  19.05% 8.33%  4.76% 


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Discrepancy Between Job Seekers and Hiring Managers

When analyzing both tables one can begin to see the differences between what job seekers in each region expect to make versus what hiring managers are actually willing to pay.  Some of the most glaring differences include:
  1. With the exception of the Northeast, the rate at which hiring managers offer lower paying jobs ($25k - $40k) versus what is desired by job candidates is, on average 3 - 4x higher.  
  2. As the salary ranges increase, the expectations of job seekers are even further out of step with reality (the West being slightly more in line).  For example, the salary expectations of workers in the Northeast, South and Midwest are approximately 5 - 10x higher than what hiring managers are willing to offer within the $150k - $200k+ range.    

Summary

Regardless of the regions, the salary expectations of most job seekers is somewhat out of step with the reality of what hiring managers are willing to offer - particularly at both extremes of the salary range spectrum. As expected, people have inflated ideals about what they are worth versus what hiring managers are willing to pay (If you're located in the South or Midwest, don't expect to receive a job offer above $150,000. It's almost non-existent!).  A bit more consistency does however exist across the middle tier salary ranges ($75 - $100k) as roughly 25% of both hiring managers and job seekers have those salary expectations. 

Up Next: Regional Salary Trends by Industry


(1) Salary Range Categories:  $25,000 - $40,000,  $40,000 - $75,000,  $75,000 - $100,000,  $100,000 - $150,000,  $150,000 - $200,000,  $200,000+




Datasource: Opportunity


Opportunity shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described or information contained on these pages. The data, information and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such. Opportunity gives no warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, utility or completeness of this information.

Q4 2016 Regional U.S. Employment Trends: Supply vs. Demand

Opportunity breaks down employment trends in the United States by region in an effort to understand the overall job market.

December 29, 2016

Overview

As we wind down 2016, Opportunity looks inward at the data offered by tens of thousands of job seekers and hiring managers in the United States over these last 3 months to understand the impact geography is having on current employment trends.  Specifically, a). where are hiring managers posting job opportunities and b). where are job seekers looking for job opportunities.  This simple report sheds some light on some basic activity found within the Opportunity professional network. 

What We Found

Of the 20,000 combined job seekers and hiring managers sampled (those who posted or updated profiles in the United States within the past 90 days), the regional breakdown is as follows:

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% of Job Seekers in the U.S. looking for employment per region:

Northeast 22%
Midwest 17%
South 35%
West 26%

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% of Hiring Managers in the U.S. posting jobs in each region:

Northeast 16%
Midwest 27%
South 30%
West 27% 

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Conclusions


Overall, the concentration of jobs being offered is evenly distributed across 3 of the 4 regions - with the Northeast being the exception - lagging behind by more than 10% and falling about 6% short of what the demand for jobs is in the region. In the Midwest a different problem exists where hiring managers are posting more jobs than there are candidates to fill them by 10%. This is consistent with other major reports showing that many major metropolitan areas in the Midwest are seeing unemployment rates fall as low as 3%.

A bleaker picture is being painted in the South however, as a signficantly higher percentage of people are looking for work - double what we're seeing in the Midwest.  The good news for the South is that the highest percentage of hiring managers also come from that region, leading one to assume that job seekers in the South are most likely underemployed (i.e. underpaid, restless and looking).  Conversely, hiring managers in the South could be experiencing high turnover rates as a result of these same reasons.

Less differences exist in the West which appears to have reached somewhat of an equilibrium - as an almost exact number of job seekers are looking to fill a similar number of positions being offered (26% vs. 27%).

Up Next:  A deeper understanding of the employment trends in each region based on salary ranges, industries and more.


Datasource: Opportunity

Opportunity shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described or information contained on these pages. The data, information and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such. Opportunity gives no warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, utility or completeness of this information.


Desired Salary Expectations Of U.S. Job Seekers Outpace Companies Willingness To Offer

Heading into 2017, Opportunity looks inward to examine the trends surrounding job seeker salary expectations versus the reality of what hiring managers are willing to offer.

December 27, 2016

Overview

‘Tis the season for thinking about one’s career and economic future. So, as we head into 2017, Opportunity wanted to take a look at salary expectations both sought and offered by job seekers and hiring managers across the United States, respectively.  Tapping into our database of over 1.3M members worldwide, we examined a random subset of 20,000 members in the U.S. (across all regions and industries) who recently indicated a preferred salary range.

What We Found

At a national level, job seekers not surprisingly wanted higher salaries than what hiring managers on average indicated they were willing to offer across the various ranges (1) reviewed by Opportunity.

Overall, hiring managers were more likely to indicate an interest in locating resources lower on the pay scale, whereas job seekers demonstrated a greater interest in locating positions that offered higher salaries. For instance, over 50% of hiring managers were looking to fill positions ranging in salaries between the $25-40k and $40-75k ranges. Conversely, just over 32% of job seekers desired salaries within these ranges.

The greatest disparity between hiring managers and job seekers occurred within the $25-40k range, where over 17% of hiring managers looked to hire at this salary compared to 5% of job seekers desiring a salary in this range.

Once salary ranges exceeded the $75k threshold, job seeker salary expectations began to outstrip hiring manager offerings. Almost 50% of job seekers desired a salary between $75-150k, whereas 42% of hiring managers offered such as salary. The discrepancy between job seekers and hiring managers increases as salary demands increase, as over 18% of job seekers desired a salary greater than $150k, whereas less than 6% of hiring managers were filling such positions.

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(1)  From left to right, salary ranges were:
$25-$40k, $40-$75k, $75-$100k, $100-$150k, $150-$200k, $200k+





Summary

In conclusion, this snapshot from Opportunity suggests hiring managers and job seekers are somewhat out of phase when it comes to salary expectations at a national level. Hiring managers are much more likely to fill positions with salaries between $25-75K, with a significant discrepancy when compared to job seekers at the lower end of this range. In contrast, job seekers are more likely than their hiring manager counterparts to desire salaries beyond $75k. It is the threshold of $75k that appears to be the inflection point where hiring manager and job seeker expectations shift at a national level.

Up Next:  A further breakdown of salary expectations for job seekers (and hiring managers) globally, regionally and per industry.


Datasource: Opportunity

Opportunity shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described or information contained on these pages. The data, information and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such. Opportunity gives no warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, utility or completeness of this information.



Employment Trends: Top 10 Global Workforce Skills 2016 vs. 2017

The Opportunity professional network identifies workforce trends among it's 1.2 million members worldwide.

December 16, 2016

Overview

As we close out 2016, Opportunity decided to take a look back over the past year at the skill sets both sought and offered by hiring managers and job seekers, respectively.

What We Found

Heading into 2016 in the US alone, hiring managers placed a premium on filling sales positions and this demand appears to have strengthened going into 2017. Four out of the top five skills sought by hiring managers entering the upcoming year were sales focused with customer service rising up the ranks most aggressively (Fig 1).

Secondarily, specific skills, such as experience with Salesforce, which made a sizable jump heading into 2017, and familiarity with particular developer languages (e.g., Java, .NET) maintained their appeal.

Entering 2016 Entering 2017
Direct Sales Direct Sales
Business Development Customer Service
Sales Management  Account Mangement 
Account Management  Sales Management 
.NET Business Development 
Project Management  Salesforce 
Customer Service  Java 
Accounting  .NET 
Java  Project Management 
Salesforce  Sales Operations 

Figure 1:  
Skills sought by U.S. hiring managers


In contrast, most of the skills offered by the workforce remained stable (Fig 2). Project and account management, as well as business development skills maintained the Top 3 skills offered, whereas leadership, customer service and sales management remained in the Top 10.

Entering 2016 Entering 2017
Project Management Project Management
Business Development Business Development
Account Management  Account Mangement 
Leadership Customer Service
Customer Service Sales Management
Sales Management  Microsoft Office 
Operations Management  Leadership
Business Analysis  Direct Sales
Microsoft Office Operations Management 
Change Management Microsoft Excel
                                                           
Figure 2:  
Skills offered by U.S. workforce


Global Outlook


The global view was similar but not as clear cut as the US totals. Entering both 2016 and 2017, sales, business development and customer service skills maintained their Top 10 position. However, both direct sales and customer service displayed an increase in demand. More specific skills such as software development or accounting skills remained stable (Fig 3).

Entering 2016 Entering 2017
Account Management Direct Sales
.NET Business Development
Business Development Customer Service
Accounting  Sales Management 
Sales Management .NET
Project Management  Account Management
Direct Sales Java 
Java Accounting
Mechanical Engineering Project Management 
Customer Service Salesforce
 
Figure 3:  
Skills sought by Global Hiring Managers


Within the workforce, the top skills offered remained largely unchanged from 2016 to 2017 (Fig 4).

Entering 2016 Entering 2017
Project Management Project Management
Business Development Business Development
Account Management  Account Mangement 
Sales Management Sales Management 
Leadership Microsoft Office
Accounting Customer Service
Customer Service  Operations Management
Operations Management Leadership
Business Analysis Accounting
Microsoft Office Language - English
 
Figure 4:  
Skills offered by Global Workforce


Summary


In conclusion, this snapshot from Opportunity suggests hiring managers are maintaining a strong focus on finding skilled sales people entering 2017 with an additional focus on technical skills associated with software development and accounting. As the economy continues to improve, there is a likelihood that more job opportunities will present themselves as companies will seek to increase their revenue and invest in their product or service offerings. Keep sharpening those skills!

Update your profile today!


Datasource: Opportunity

Opportunity shall not be held liable for improper or incorrect use of the data described or information contained on these pages. The data, information and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such. Opportunity gives no warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, utility or completeness of this information.